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It’s been quite a year for the 877 team, a label which we honestly feel so honoured to be working with so closely at the moment. Headed up by Brighton’s own Dom, a true veteran of bass music culture and an ever evolving underground dance music scene, 877 Records is a true beacon of creativity and originality, a fact which is undeniable when you take a second to peek through both their roster and now extensive back catalogue. 
It’s been one hell of a month in realms of dance and bass music, as we start to trickle towards the end of year rush. Traditionally, the music industry shuts down for the best part of December, so labels and multiple other platforms are currently attempting to get their years finished up and start work on 2020 ASAP.
What a time we have upon us for UK music, with the explosion of UKG, the resurgence of dubstep, the worldwide expansions of bass and grime, and of course, the fantastic new delvings into the realms of UK Funky, spearheaded by some of the most exciting producers the UK has seen in quite some time. 
As a series, Charted is a perfect way for us to look into the selections and tastes of some of the most influential faces around the music scene of the UK. We are very excited to be welcoming in Koast for our next edition, one of Bristol’s most influential vocalists and forward thinkers within the bass scene.
Within the vast, expansive and ever developing realms of bass music in the UK, we are always looking for the next big sound. The last few years has seen bassline take the lead roll, with artists now touring the world off the back of vicious 4×4 creations. However, over the last year, it would be safe to say that UK funky’s notoriety has been significantly enhanced, becoming established as one of the most exciting corners of modern bass music.
If there is one genre that has made a serious impact on UK underground music through it’s revival in 2018 it has to be UK Funky, which through a combination of inclusions from top selectors and an internal need for more rhythmic influences within the scene has become a major influence across multiple underground genres.